CHAPTER SIX: THE WAR ON TERRORISM (part one of three)

“War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself”

— John Stuart Mill

Every American old enough at the time remembers where they were on 9/11!  Some remember it as distinctly as the day President Kennedy was assassinated or the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded after liftoff.  On that fateful September day, radical Islam declared a new religious crusade against Western Civilization.  In an act of war, terrorists sounded their call for the destruction of our very way of life.  Denouncing everything we say we stand for: truth, liberty and justice, they took aim at what they believe our nation is founded upon.  Money!   

As the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers buckled amidst plumes of smoke, hundreds of thousands, millions across the planet cheered for the destruction of America.   Our hearts sank at the tragedy – they praised Allah.  Over a decade later, and the nightmare has only deepened.  The war in Iraq and the ongoing war Afghanistan  collectively endured longer than both World Wars combined.  The death toll is only rising with militant fundamentalists in Pakistan and Iran fueling the chaos. 

Make no mistake about it.  As September 11, 2001 proved- the threat is real.  The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the bombings in Spain and England, the attacks on Mumbai, the genocide in Darfur, the fragile stability of Pakistan, and the belligerence of Iran’s president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad – all of these are testaments to the absolute malevolence we are facing.   

Americans are constantly on terror alert, paranoid much the same as we were of Russian spies and nuclear holocaust during the Cold War.  And every day that we are called on to put our sons and daughters in the line of fire we question our purpose and our resolve is tested.  This dichotomy of good and evil in religion is not new to the history of man, but this time it is most insidious and horrifying. 

Before we can address how we should wage the war on terror, we must first understand the reality of what exact threat it is that we are facing.  What every American needs to understand with absolute clarity is just how severe and pervasive the threat really is, because it is clear that so many of us are unaware of the profundity of this ideological menace. 

Now, media pundits often make the case that our government is war mongering, striking fear into the hearts of American citizens for the tactical purpose of some ulterior motive.  They will argue that the threat is nowhere near as terrible as President Bush made it out to be.  I wish it were the case, but the unfortunate truth is that the media’s conspiratorial claims are misguided and they do the American citizens a horrible injustice by sugarcoating the severity of the clear and present danger posed by Islamic Fundamentalism. 

The jihad being waged by radical Islam is not being fought by a mere band of scattered guerilla warriors hiding in far off deserts or the remote caves of Tora Bora, Afghanistan.  Radical Islam does not consist only of Al Queda and the Taliban; it is a way of life, an extreme and fanatic mentality bread into the hearts and minds of millions across the globe.

We must remember that with the destruction of the World Trade Center, there was a general response within the Muslim world of jubilee.  Two days before the attacks of September 11, the Mufti of Palestine, the senior religious figure in the Palestinian authority, and with millions of followers, openly prayed on radio for Allah to destroy Great Britain, Israel and the United States.   After the Twin Towers buckled, almost immediately, Palestinian airwaves were flooded with propaganda, boasting that a divine blow in the name of Allah had been dealt against the enemy [the United States] and that Israel is to follow.

We must understand further that this propaganda machine is not confined to remote villages or forgotten corners of the world.  The machine is vast, spanning continents and infecting the minds of people in Africa, Asia, Europe, South and North America.  There are the Pakistan based Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammed, who seek the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir’s accession to Pakistan; the Bangledeshi Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen; the Chechnyan separatist “Special Purpose Islamic Regiment”; the Sunni Hezbollah of Turkey and the Shia Hezbollah of Lebanon.  In Iraq there’s the Abu Musab al-Zarqawi’s al-Qaeda affiliate, and Al-Faruq Brigades, a militant wing of the Islamic Movement in Iraq (Al-Harakah al-Islamiyyah fi al-arak) to name only a few.  There’s the Israeli and Palestinian Al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades and Hamas, which calls for the destruction of Israel.  Armed terrorist organizations are growing in Algeria, Yemen, the Philippines, the Sudan, Russia, Georgia, Spain, France, England, Germany – the list goes on and on as the cancer spreads – even into the United States!

The dangerous ideology these extremists preach is in fact more than simple dogmatic propaganda.  It is a media of terrorism.  And it is so prevalent, literally as ubiquitous as CNN and Fox News are to us Americans, that the fanaticism it preaches has become part of the way the populations of these regions see the world.  The machine targets youth – often the most innocent, those that are lost, without shelter, food, medical care, a family.  It pontificates a culture of hatred, a demonization of western culture, appealing to those in extreme poverty, those with the least hope, by promising heaven in the afterlife if, and only if, an oath to wage jihad against America is taken.

The infiltration of radical Islam into our cultures is so deep and pervasive, it is shocking.   The frontlines aren’t just in Iraq and Afghanistan, or even Pakistan, Israel or India.  Their ideology is spreading like a malignant tumor, feeding on human desperation with frightening speed.  The front lines, my fellow Americans, are in Madrid, Paris, London, Berlin, Washington D.C., New York, right down to Fort Hood, Texas.  Their twisted worldview of unquestionable obedience to Allah and destruction of Judeo-Christian Civilization is in our very own backyards.  Their war, their ideology of hatred, has come ashore our land of liberty, and they have sworn to take us down by any means.

Yet, in America, we tend to think of this extreme fundamentalist sect as being in the decided minority in the nation of Islam, small and distant.  And while the terrorist acts on 911, in Madrid and London’s train stations, in Germany, in Mumbai, now make us turn our heads, we still generally think of Muslims as good, law abiding, faithful, loving people because we don’t see the fanaticism in the Muslims that live amongst us. 

In America, this belief in the goodness innate in Muslims as a religious people is accurate and right.  We know that not all Muslims are part of radical Islam, we have faith in the moral compass of our Islamic neighbors, and rightfully so.  But, the false logic is this.  Just because the majority of Muslim Americans are peaceful, virtuous, law abiding people, it does not mean that all are.  Not internationally and not domestically. 

The Qur’an is a beautiful religious text, and in its purpose to the nations of Islam as the verbal divine guidance and moral direction for mankind it stands as perhaps the finest piece of literature in the Arabic language.  Just as the Bible teaches morality, compassion towards others, and the rule of law, so does the Qur’an.  In fact, The Qur’an itself cites an intimate, reverential relationship with the earlier transcribed Torah and New Testament, attributing their similarities to their unique origin from having been revealed by the one God.

It is He Who sent down to thee in truth, the Book, confirming what went before it; and He sent down the Law (of Moses) and the Gospel (of Jesus) before this, as a guide to mankind, and He sent down the criterion (of judgment between right and wrong).

 -Qur’an 3:3

But our sense of security is false when we translate what we know of domestic Islam into a belief that extreme fundamentalist Islam is few in numbers and that, as “Muslims”, they actually follow the Qur’an.  Whereas our system or ordered liberty is founded upon the Judeo-Christian virtues that celebrate the sanctity of life and teach us the truth that love is the fulfillment of the law, radical Islam teaches their children to hate in life and die for the sake of Allah.

These radicals, we must understand, don’t follow the Qur’an.  They think they do, in fact they obstinately proselytize that they do.  But in fact, many of them have not even read the Qur’an.  Discounting the hundreds and thousands of these radicals that are illiterate, those that do read often don’t read the Qur’an.  While the Qur’an teaches compassion, love and equal justice, they instead follow the teachings and writings of men like Mohammad Ibn Abdul-Wahhab, an 18th century zealot desert preacher who preached that all forms of adornment and modernity are blasphemous and that all non-believers in his version of Islam must be converted or destroyed. 

Unlike traditional Islam, Wahhabism treats women as third class citizens, imposes the veil on them, and denies them basic human rights such as the freedom of traveling within the country or leaving it without permission or Mahram (a relative male chaperon).

In addition, Wahhabism outlaws the celebration of Almoulid, the Prophet Mohammad’s birthday, forbids religious freedom, outlaws political freedom and forces the public to observe strictly regimented prayers.  Wahhabist authorities intimidate the masses by publicly beheading convicted killers and hand-amputating alleged thieves.   Perhaps most telling of this “theology’s” absolute perversion is the fact that it considers itself to be the only correct way in all of Islam, and any Muslim who opposes it is a heretic who must be enslaved.

This is not Islam as learned from the Qur’an, rather a fundamentally savage, backward and perverted form of preaching that is contrary to the Qur’an and it is used to brainwash legions of extremist Muslims to become hell-bent on the destruction of America.  It is not the Qur’an that has taught them to wage jihad and convert by the sword or die in martyrdom with the promise of a thousand virgins.  Rather, it is an entirely different set of books, books of jihad written or orally passed down by Wahhabist-style preachers who follow and embellish upon Mohammad Ibn Abdul-Wahhab’s teachings and the like.

What we see all across the world is the utilization of these perverted teachings in order to preach Wahhabism through wrote memorization to an illiterate or otherwise impoverished, desperate and credulous set of Muslims.  In Afghanistan, the Taliban employ this technique with horrifying efficiency through a network of Saudi Arabian funded schools called Madrasahs.  In these Medrasahs no subjects are taught except for Wahhabism.  The hopeless are brought in, given food and shelter, with the requirement of submitting to the teachings therein.  

Medrasah, literally means school, and historically they have not been anti-American, anti-Western, pro-terrorist centers having less to do with teaching basic literacy and more to do with political and theological indoctrination.  And certainly not all are today.  But, these Medrasahs of which I speak are widespread and they are effectively brainwashing a generation of desperate Muslims to hateAmerica, to hate western civilization, and to covet the destruction of all that we stand for.

They brainwash their recruits and followers to believe that they’ve revived the Islamic jihad, dividing the world into two camps, the Muslim and the non-Muslim.  They sermonize that Allah is happy when non-Muslims die.  That the laws of Islam, the books of jihad, demand that non-Muslims are to be taken to the slaughter.  To these radicals, any non-Wahhabist Muslim, to include American Muslims, are called Kafirs (infidels), cows to be taken to market, sold, and butchered.  Quite literally, they are brainwashed to believe that no infidel is innocent, period.

Americans must understand that a countless horde has demonized us.  It seems so odd and inconceivable to us that so many people have been brainwashed to this end.  But, to fathom this mentality, again, we need only look to our own, relatively recent history.  Recall that Christians, out of the desperation caused in the aftermath of World War 1, fell for the extreme Nazi propaganda machine calling for the eradication of the Jews.  If we fell for it, why would the Muslims not when faced with similar extreme conditions?

A seed of anti-Semitism, just as it did in Nazi Germany, has burst, bringing Christianity, and all other faiths into the crosshairs.  Hitler committed a crime against the youth of Germany by stealing their innocence and brainwashing them with a message of hatred.  Radical Islam is committing the same crime against non-radical Islam, stealing their youth, capitalizing on desperation and ignorance to instill a fundamental hatred of any non-radical, Muslim, Christian, Jew and Hindi alike.  In many regions of the world, hundreds of thousands of these radicals comprise the majority and any non-radical Muslim living in the purview of these terrorist havens is treated like a cow, a target to be slaughtered on site.

One would think that drawing a similarity to Hitler’s Nazi regime would be the most horrifying analogy possible.  Yet, the circular dogma that lead to fascism under the Nazi regime was actually less dangerous and sinister than radical Islam.  In Hitler’s Germany, Nazi’s hated and killed in the name of the Fuhrer, while in radical Islam, jihadists terrorize in the name of God.   Their creed is the same; destroy all those that do not believe as they do.  With the Arian race, this hatred was primarily confined to the Jews, whereas radical Islam has widened its sights and taken aim at Christians, Budhists, Hindi, and even Muslims that do not believe as they do.

America must wake up to this unfortunate reality.  And we must be willing to appropriately and decidedly address any insight to violence against Western Civilization, regardless of whether the origin of the incantation is domestic or foreign.

A clear understanding of this threat, though, is only the first step to thwarting it. The next question is one that has to date eluded us on many fronts; how do we fight this terrorism?

As aforementioned, we must first look inward to see what we are made of.  To be clear, I’m not talking of our strength and resolve, as I believe our endurance through the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars is proof of America’s tenacity.  Further, a proper understanding of the threat’s pervasiveness should only fortify our steadfastness as a nation.  Rather, I am talking about our morality.  Perhaps more pointedly, I am talking about our priorities.

You see, these terrorists have made a calculated decision in the way they are waging their war.  Presented with the dilemma of taking down a giant, a world superpower with a vastly superior military, they have hedged their bet.  Strictly speaking, they have bet that we are consumed by money and that if they can take down our economy, they can win their war.  Why do you think Osama bin Laden chose the World Trade Center as his first target on 9/11?    

Radical Islam preys on the impoverished, brainwashing extremism into the minds of those living in extreme conditions.  They promise something as simple as food and shelter to the hopeless, the desperate, and the forgotten souls of society, and then bombard them with fanaticism.  It is a vicious cycle of impoverishment leading to fanaticism and extremism which inexorably results in violence.

Radical Islam is aiming to create the same impoverished and hopeless reality in western civilization.  It starts with one street in Detroit perhaps, where nobody has jobs, everyone has been evicted from their homes, crime and drugs are rampant.  Then they offer their poisoned apple in this extreme reality, promising the fruits of a happier, sanctified life.  Instead, they will give over strict fanaticism, breed extremism, and eventually demand violence.  We are already witness to this reality. 

They hope to do this, first, by bringing down our economies.  Their design is to turn our collective societal wealth and comfort on its head, lead us into bankruptcy and then allow what they perceive as our immorality to tear us apart from within.  Much like the Spanish Conquistadors divided and conquered Incan civilization when they came ashore in South America, they aim to factionalize us, get us to fight amongst ourselves over a dwindling supply of money, and then convert us by the sword when our defenses are down.

We must understand that, to the terrorists, we are not a nation of moral, benevolent people.  Instead, we are non-believers who are laden with greed.  They see us as power hungry demons thirsting for global dominance and filthy riches.  Their bet is that in bankruptcy we will turn our back on our own Constitution; that we will brush our Bill of Rights under the rug and denounce everything we say we believe in.   

Of course, each one of us will unwaveringly respond to this gross characterization adamant that we are not what they perceive us to be.  We believe it in our hearts – we know it!  And I absolutely believe it to be the truth that we are not these greedy, filthy demons; rather we are a force for justice, for liberty, for morality and peace. 

That being said, and it utterly pains me to say, our greed and increasingly sedentary ways are of grave concern.  Our economic crisis is beginning to shed light on some of our true, less flattering colors.  And it is incumbent upon us, individually and as a nation, to take a long hard look at ourselves in the mirror.  We must recognize our flaws, embrace the fact that we have a lot of work to do, understand that we are far from perfect, and move forward with our core ideals reaffirmed.  If we can do that and only if we can do that – the war on terror is already won and America will come back stronger than ever.

To start then, let us look in the mirror. 

The economic collapse, exacerbated by the war on terror, is testing the moral fabric of our society.   Capitalism, our fundamental system of free commerce, is being impeached, our banks and industries are collapsing, and our infrastructure is corroding in disrepair.  Our homes, nearly ten million of our American Dreams, now stand vacant, devoid of families.   Unemployment has reached 10% nationwide, crimes of extreme moral turpitude, divorce and domestic violence are rising sharply and our boarders are being invaded by illegal aliens without respect for the law. 

Unfortunately, while these trials and tribulations befall us, our government is failing us.  As we look to our elected officials, too often, the mirror they reflect of us is one in accord with radical Islam’s disgusting critique of our society.  I say this because Washington’s answer to all our troubles seems to be one dimensional: throw money at the problem and demonize the opposition.  Mark my words – if this continues, we fail.

The question that presents itself in this pivotal moment in history is whether, in the face of deepening financial turmoil, we will continue with the materialistic, over-indulgent, sedentary mindset that set us up for our current economic collapse, or whether we will reaffirm our moral grounding as a nation and fight for all that is good in America by standing, rolling up our sleeves, and doing what is right, regardless of the difficulty.

Regrettably, our government is acting only to reinforce our materialism, exactly as they have for decades.  Government policy has encouraged us to spend on credit and take on mounting debt to where by the end of 2009, total U.S. consumer debt reached an astronomical $2.45 trillion, with total individual household debt, including credit cards, mortgage, home equity, and student loans, skyrocketing to nearly $17,000 per household.  The mean average unpaid credit card balance jumped to $3,389 per person in America. 

Believe it or not, this spelled disaster for the Federal Government, but not because the amount was too high, rather because the total U.S. Consumer debt had dropped sharply from $2.56 trillion at the end of 2008.  The recession meant that people weren’t spending.  Something had to be done!

So, in short-sited reaction to this fiscal meltdown, our government has responded with an economic stimulus plan centered on encouraging us to spend.  First, we were given a measly $200 tax refund and encouraged to quickly go and spend it – God forbid save it.  And, we spent it, plus some, just as the government wanted us to.  Why?  Because, we’ve been told that our economy is based upon consumer spending and that if we stop spending, the engines of our economy will grind to a halt.  If Washington can just keep us spending our hard earned money, they believe the economy will continue to grow at a healthy rate.   Unfortunately, they are wrong!  And they are wrong because our spending is no longer rationally linked to our production.  Because income is being eclipsed by our expenses we have for decades now been forced to live on credit.  What happens when that credit runs out?

Washington governs itself with this same spendthrift state of mind that we have individually adopted, and as a result the United States public debt (the “Federal Debt”), which consists of two calculations: “Debt Held by the Public”, defined as U.S. Treasury securities held by institutions outside the United States Government, and the “Gross Debt,” which includes intra-government obligations such as securities held by the Social Security Trust fund or the Federal Reserve, is absolutely staggering. 

Note that the costs incurred in World War II, in addition to President Roosevelt’s New Deal, and the social programs of the Truman presidency caused a sixteenfold increase in the Federal Debt from approximately $16 billion in 1930 to $260 billion in 1950.  As a Republican, it pains me to say that this debt more than quintupled during the Reagan and Bush presidencies from 1980 to 1992. Then came the war on terror and during the administration of President George W. Bush, the debt increased from $5.6 trillion in January 2001 to $10.7 trillion by December 2008, rising from 58% of GDP to 70.2% of GDP.   But now, under the Obama administration, the situation has deteriorated at a far more alarming rate.

As of September, 2010, the Federal Debt of $13.56 trillion was approximately 94% of U.S. annual GDP – now, in January, 2012, our debt of $15+ trillion is more than 100% of our annual GDP.  In simple terms, we are drowning.  And this is what radical Islam wants.  Because, with such unconscionable debt, more and more of our money must go to the purchase of government debt, rather than into investments in productive capital goods such as factories and computers, leading to lower output and incomes than would otherwise occur, further exacerbating the situation.  A downward spiral is begun much the same as an individual with too many credit cards fighting to pay even the minimum monthly balance, drowning in interest, and never saving for the future. 

The Federal Debt is a phenomenal threat to our national security.  Why?  Because if higher marginal tax rates are used to pay the rising interest costs of this debt, individual and corporate savings will be reduced and work, industry, and innovation will be depressed.  How then will we pay for the renovation, much less the re-engineering of our decaying infrastructure?  We won’t!  We will continue to import 9,013,000 barrels of oil per day at a staggering cost of $297 billion per year.  Over $50 billion of which goes to countries that harbor and arm terrorists bent on our absolute destruction.    

In fact, the interest costs on our debts are already forcing reductions in government programs that the government actually ought to be administering.  And, it’s not just the federal government – nearly every state in the Union is facing a massive budget crisis.  As a result, more and more Americans are out on the street with nobody to turn to.   No help, no food, no hope.  This growing crowd of people has already become malcontent and in many cases outright enraged at the government.  Occupy Wall Street is just the beginning.  How much worse will it need to get before there are armed riots in the streets?

It is upon the most impoverished, uneducated, enraged and hopeless of this crowd that radical Islam will focus upon to recruit domestic terrorists.  It is upon these people they are already successfully preying upon in Europe.

Unfortunately, the situation is only primed to worsen.  As a result of our over-consumption, individual, corporate, and government alike, and the tremendous amounts of money we have spent bailing out Wall Street, we will eventually have to pay a price in terms of higher taxes to meet the interest on that debt.  Higher taxes will unfortunately become requisite to meet the claims of our foreign creditors.

Yet, our government, on both sides of the isle it now seems, is increasingly adept at hearing one message sounding from us: no more taxes.  How then can the government deal with this debt?  First off, to date, they have not.  For thirty plus years our government has kicked the can down the road for future generations to deal with the problem.  That generation is us, now!

Historically, in an attempt to forego raising taxes, such debts have been met with the temptation to default by stealth.   In other words, allowing the dollar’s value to deflate. 

But, the dollar’s deflation means something equally as grave for Americans – inflation.  Soon, we likely could see the cost of a gallon of milk rise to $15, an ear of corn to $5, cereal, butter, sugar, meats, our entire grocery bill could go up in cost by 20-30%.  This inflation, coupled with an unemployment rate that continues to climb, and where salaries are frozen or slashed for those still employed, spells even further economic disaster.  It is a recipe for civil unrest! 

More and more people will fall into impoverishment.  The middle class will become the poor and the poor will become the destitute.  It is in this economic climate that radical Islam wants us to fester.  We must wake up from this nightmare immediately because commodities have already skyrocketed in cost and that expense is already being passed on to the American consumer.  Across the board, everything from groceries to clothes, plastics, etc. have already increased in cost by 5-15% in the last few years.  Inflation has already begun!

The first and most important thing we must do in order to intelligently combat terrorism, then, is to revamp our economy.  I’m not speaking of turning our back on capitalism in favor of socialism as many of the disillusioned have proffered out of fear.  Not at all.  In fact, I believe passionately that the key to our economic salvation is capitalism, in its true, pure form.

We must unleash the power of American ingenuity; promote and foster intellectual investment in American business so that we may once again produce for export as well as domestic consumption.  For Washington’s belief that consumer spending is essential to keep the engines of our economy running is true, but it is only half of the equation. 

Production is the necessary second half of the economic equation, for when a company produces something that people want to consume, the basic and elementary economic law of supply and demand is fulfilled.  Yet, for decades, America has failed to produce at a level necessary to meet the demands of our own consumption and the result is nearly a trillion dollar a year trading deficit.

The U.S. has held a trade deficit since late in the 1960s, but since 1997, our trade deficit has been increasing at a rapid rate.  Between 2005 and 2006 for example, the U.S. trade deficit increased by $49.8 billion to a worldwide record high of $817.3 billion.   It is now over a trillilon dollars per year.

 “We must always take heed that we buy no more from strangers than we sell them, for so should we impoverish ourselves and enrich them.”

–Fernand Braudel, The Wheels of Commerce

To be clear, the concern here is not necessarily with the size of the trade deficit.  This is because the trade deficit can be affected by myriad factors such as the cost of production (land, labor, taxes) in the exporting economy vis-à-vis the importing, the cost and availability of raw materials, exchange rates, trade restrictions, and the price of goods manufactured.  In fact, as Milton Friedman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and father of Monetarism contended, trade deficits are not necessarily, in and of themselves, omens of economic failure, because high export levels increase the value of the exporting currency, eventually reducing aforementioned exports, and vice versa for imports, thus naturally removing trade deficits not due to investment. 

By reductio ad absurdum, 19th century economist and philosopher Frédéric Bastiat, even argued that the national trade deficit was an indicator of a successful economy, rather than a failing one. Bastiat predicted that a successful, growing economy would result in greater trade deficits, and an unsuccessful, shrinking economy would result in lower trade deficits.  And it seems these theories are being proven fundamentally sound given that since the Great Recession began the annual U.S. trade deficit has fallen by over $3 billion.

The real concern here is the fact that the Federal Deficit is mounting along side a trade deficit – compounding the issue.  Essentially, we are borrowing money to trade in the red.  Or to play off of a syllogism:  We are borrowing from China so we can rob Peter to pay Paul.

The reason for this phenomenon stems from America’s continuing failure to produce goods for the marketplace, both domestic and international.  The free system of enterprise, the liberties afforded us as a people, long left people like Andrew Carnegie to modernize the production of steel.  Yet, for a number of reasons, America is no longer producing goods for sale.  Instead, we consume and put the cost on our credit cards, individually, and as a nation.

Post-World War II, America was primed as the world’s industrial superpower.  The factories previously manned by “Rosie the Riveter” women in order to crank out the war machines were primed to build modern America.  And when the greatest generation returned from saving the world from fascism they were ready to go to work in the only true remaining industrialized nation on the planet.  All other industrialized nations sizeable enough to compete, after all, had been leveled in the war.

What came next were America’s economic golden years.   Through grit and hard work, we built the wealthiest, most industrialized, modern nation on the planet.  The United States GDP grew to a record $482.7 billion by the end of the 1950s. In the 1960s our nation enjoyed the most sustained period of economic expansion we’d ever known, accompanied by rising productivity and low unemployment. With real income rising 50% during the decade we were sitting pretty with more Americans enjoying the luxuries of the middle class lifestyle than ever before.

But, then came the advent of deindustrialization in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Among other factors, increased free trade, globalization and high corporate taxes resulted in U.S. companies shifting their manufacturing and heavy industrial operations to second- and third-world countries with lower labor costs.  It literally became more attractive to the American corporation’s bottom lines to dismantle their industrial infrastructures in favor of producing elsewhere.  While this meant a flood of cheaper imported goods into our economy for us to purchase, these policies resulted in a massive reduction in the percent of the U.S. labor force engaged in industry (from over 35% in the late 1960s to under 20% today).

Detroit and the auto-industry are an unfortunate example of de-industrialization and the effect it has had on our nation.  Once the world’s largest center of automobile production and associated with a high standard of living, Detroit today is associated with a high concentration of poverty, unemployment and manifest racial isolation. The vast urban production complexes that once built the automobiles driving on our highways stand abandoned and over one third of Detroit’s residents now live below the poverty line.  Similar fates have befallen the steel industry of Pittsburgh, the manufacturing and shipping industries of Baltimore, and so the list goes on. 

The simple fact stands that the American economy has undergone a fundamental shift from a manufacturing and industrial based economy to a service based economy. 

After World War II service industries accounted for less than10% of non-farming employment, compared with 38% for manufacturing. But, since the late 1960s the American economy has moved away from producing goods to providing services at a disquieting rate.  

In 1970, there were approximately 50 million service-providing workers in the United States and 23 million employed in the goods-producing sector, representing a service-to-goods ratio of about two-to-one. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the ratio of service-to-goods workers soared to five-to-one with over a third of the U.S. population employed in the service industry by 2005.  The face of our economy has completely changed – and it is destroying us.

American consumption currently accounts for over 70% of our GDP.  Of this 70%, half is spent on services, such as hair cuts, car washes and restaurants.  The problem, then, is this: if we’re just going out to restaurants, what are we selling to the rest of the world?  With all that China is selling to us, what are we selling to them and the remainder of the world?  Very little!  And hence our enormous trade deficits. 

Analogy time:  Think of Jamaica, or almost any destination in the Caribbean archipelago.  What is the common thread between the economies of these beautiful islands?  All of their economies are primarily dependent on the tourism industry.  They do not produce much of anything, rather, they provide services, and as a result their economies are weak, unemployment is high, and those that do work earn low wages.  Well, in America, the problem is much worse to scale. 

While we provide services to ourselves, all we are doing is redistributing wealth amongst ourselves.  But, in order to provide those services we are consuming products from overseas.  The result: we are redistributing wealth amongst ourselves from a dwindling pot.   

There has been a forty-year mass exodus in America from our time-honored tradition of rolling up our sleeves, working hard, and making products for sale in the marketplace.  Instead of reversing this trend, however, the drift has been worsening in recent years.  Post 9/11, the United States has shut down nearly 45,000 factories, equating to a loss of one-third of our manufacturing jobs in that timeframe.  At the end of 2009, 12 million jobs in the U.S. were geared toward the manufacture of goods.  The last time so few jobs in the United States comprised the manufacturing sector was prior to World War 2, before we climbed out of the Great Depression, and when our population was far fewer in numbers.

The result is a reality in America where overall capitalization in the stock market exceeds 100% of U.S. GDP.  Historically, the stock market’s value has been approximately 58% of GDP with lows hovering at 37% in the early 1950s and 25% during the Great Depression. Highs in this measurement were around 75% of GDP, each occurring at all the significant market downturns in the last eighty years, including the 1929 and 1966 crashes. 

As recently as 1991, the market was at the historic 58% level of GDP. Since then, however, we’ve completely lost site of this economic indicator.  By the 4th quarter of 1999 stock market capitalization increased to a confounding 185% of total GDP!  

We’ve all seen this at play.  Each day when we watch the news or check our phone apps, we see that the stock market is soaring or strong.  But how can it be that the Dow Jones Industrial Average is doing so well when America is drowning in unemployment and debt?  The answer, unfortunately, is that two economies have burgeoned.  One for the rich, and one for the poor, with the middle class being torn in either direction, more often than not toward the poor.

America’s economy now primarily consists of one’s and o’s – digital currency for the rich to play with and the poor to sit out.  When we aren’t producing anything the only way to make money is to invest in others that do and maneuver around the marketplace with snakelike craft.  Wall Street is first-rate at this, but the result is the constant ebb and flow of boom and bust in the marketplace.  The dot.com and sub-prime lending bursts are just the most recent, and with each bubble, the rich are getting richer; with each burst, the poor are getting poorer. 

This last crash has been the most telling of this wealth disparity.  Since the dawn of the Great Recession, Americans have lost an estimated average of more than a quarter of their collective net worth; housing prices, historically our largest nest egg, have dropped over 30% from their 2006 peak; total retirement assets, Americans’ second-largest household asset, dropped by 22%; savings and investment assets lost $1.2 trillion and pension assets lost $1.3 trillion across the board. Taken together, these losses approximately total an unimaginable loss of $10 trillion from the pockets of hard working Americans.

Meanwhile, the number of millionaires living in the U.S. has spiked.  In 1928, one year before the Great Depression began, the wealthiest .001% of the U.S. population owned about 892 times more than 90% of the nation’s citizens. Today, the top .001% of the U.S. population owns over 976 times more than the entire bottom 90%. 

Then there’s this fact which has Americans enraged: according to a study by the Institute for Policy Studies, in 2008, top executives in the United States took home salaries that were 319 times greater than the average worker (about $10 million per CEO).  We see reports of massive profits and obscene bonuses at the very firms who owe their continued existence to $700 billion in TARP funds – our tax dollars.  No wonder we are exercising our First Amendment right to assemble in the streets and protest corporate greed.

Here is where we must be very careful however.  Many have begun to argue that the financial crisis is merely a subset of a systemic crisis – capitalism itself.  According to Samir Amin, an Egyptian Marxist economist, for example, the constant decrease in GDP growth rates in Western Civilizations since the early 1970s created a growing surplus of capital which did not have sufficient profitable investment outlets in the real economy.  The alternative was to place this surplus into the financial market, which became more profitable than capital investment, especially with subsequent deregulation.  The result being the financial bubbles that keep on bursting.  This, by the way, is exactly what radical Islam wants us to do – impeach our own economy.

But, capitalism is not to blame.  I do agree that the decrease in GDP growth rates have lead to insufficient profitable investment outlets in our real economy, leading to engorgement in the financial market.  The problem, however, is failure to produce, not capitalism.  Our economic policies must again be geared toward the promotion of capital investment, because socialism, history has shown us, will do just the opposite.  Capitalism, then, is the answer!

Instead, our government is itching to intervene in corporate operations in order to cut CEO pay.  But this is America. We don’t disparage wealth. In fact, we always have and must continue to encourage it.  This is precisely why President Obama’s $500,000 cap on executive pay sets a bad precedent.  Cutting executive pay simply is not the answer.

Instead, regulating corporate expenditures is a disincentive to innovate and produce.  Government intervention in the free market, we must continue to recognize, is a very dangerous thing.  Now, Obama’s decision actually was palatable in that it applied only to executives of firms that we, as taxpayers, bailed out to the tune of $700 billion- but it must stop there. 

CEO’s making as much money as they do, we must understand, is a natural function of the free market.  Understandably upset at our losses, we often forget that these people lead major multinational corporations with scores of employees and $50 billion in annual revenue. Performing properly, they create thousands of jobs, deliver a lifetime of wealth for innumerable investors, and drive life-changing innovation.  While most chief executives are in fact compensated at a far lower rate than our NBA superstars and Hollywood celebrities, the criticisms thrown at them are far more relentless.  Moreover, in the economics of large multinational corporations, $10 million is no more than a line item budget amount for office supplies such as pens and paper.  

We are understandably upset at the chasm growing between the rich and the poor, and as such, it is only natural for the middle class to look up at the rich with disdain as they fall toward the lower class.  However, it is my opinion that the only real problem with CEO compensation is the fact that we, the government and the media are demonizing the wrong people.  Out of anger, we are looking for a scapegoat, the rich.  We’ve grown to hate those that are succeeding in their industries because our livelihoods are vanishing. 

We must pause, take a step back and realize just how un-American the abhorrence of the rich is and turn our attention back to the real problem facing our nation’s economy. 

America is the land where enterprise and the chance at becoming rich has always been encouraged.  We must never discourage people from getting rich, lest we discourage innovation and progress.  It is wrong of us to detest those that have gotten rich in their industries.  What is proper is for every American worker to be upset at the fact that there are fewer and fewer opportunities for them to get rich or even sustain middle class status.  We should also be mad that many of the rich are ostensibly hijacking Congress to ensure they remain rich despite the hurtful consequences to the remainder of the constituency.

The real problem in America, what is causing the growing rift between the rich and the poor in our nation is not capitalism, it is how we are wielding the power of the free market.  We built our nation through hard work and determination, but for decades now we have been content to sit idle instead of continuing as the pioneers of industry.  

Why?  To an extent it is because of human nature.  As I said before, man is much like water, instinctually inclined to take the path of least resistance.   So, again, let us take a long hard look in the mirror.  Individually, most of us would rather work in the services sector as white collar workers rather than in a theoretically more difficult blue collar vocation.  It certainly is physically less demanding.  As a nation, we worked so hard building modern America, generating massive amounts of wealth, and sometimes we feel entitled to kick back and relax.  This is only human nature, and the wealth accumulated in our golden years afforded us the ability to utilize our mental talents toward innovation and pay others to do the back breaking labor for us.  Why fix your sink when you can pay a plumber to do it, right? 

But we must awake from this apathy because, as a nation, we no longer have the money to pay the plumber.  Unfortunately, though, we’ve been very slow to wake from our lethargy in part because our economic and tax policies have compounded the issue by encouraging our instinctual indolence and masking its effects. 

Now, you are probably wondering why I am talking so much about the economy in a chapter purportedly aimed at the issue of international terrorism.  The reason is simple.  Our economic security is intrinsically linked to our national security, especially when it comes to the war on terror.  The insolvency of our nation will bankrupt our ability to fight terrorism abroad and lead to civil unrest within our boarders.   This must not happen because we absolutely must win this war.  What we face in radical Islam is a clash of civilizations and they have made it very clear that it is either us or them.  Failure, then, is not an option. 

Here is what radical Islam thinks of us: we are succumbing to sloth.  We are greedy, we want to consume everything, and we don’t want to have to work for it.  Radical Islam is betting that we are the next Rome and that we will implode, falling upon the sword of our own opulence.  They forecast that globalization and the additional financial pressures their mounting campaigns of terror have on our bottom line will result in us becoming slaves to the third world.  They believe that the third world upon which we prey for all that we consume will surpass us; that the balance of power will shift in their favor and we will grow weaker and weaker.  Their hope is that our current economic crisis will snowball into a downward spiral, leaving us broken and powerless to stop the spread of their twisted creed.

But they are dead wrong!  Americans work harder than the citizens of any other nation on this planet.  We are the most innovative workforce on the globe and our collective talent eclipses all others.  Laziness, while an exacerbating factor, is not to blame.  Resting on our laurels is.  This crisis is borne out of our societal ignorance and collective indifference to the direction we have allowed our government to steer the economy for the last forty years.  We’ve all been playing ignorant to the effects of our service based economy; our natural human instinct to take the easy road has blinded us as to the inevitable rise of Asia as an economic powerhouse with whom we must compete.  But now, after decades of craftily avoiding the unavoidable through the stock market, we are finally learning the truth.  The truth of the matter is this: we must get back to work producing for ourselves and the rest of the world.  For the rest of the world also wants and is willing to compete for the standard of living we’ve shown them is possible.

This is precisely why educating America about the true threat facing us, the true crisis facing our economy, and how to transcend these challenges is of paramount importance.  The silver lining in the Great Recession is the fact that it is opening our eyes.  The extremes we are facing, massive unemployment, for instance, are shaking us from our apathy, forcing us to ask the tough questions.  The key is to answer those questions intelligently and educate America as to just how far down the wrong path we have gone so that we may redirect.

I believe that in America, our privileges, the opportunities we have, our wealth, our power – this has not made us weak and lazy anymore than it did the greatest generation before they left for World War II.  We’ve had more opportunity than any civilization before us to venture down that road of lethargy, and in many respects we have, but hopefully to realize the evils of excess.  In fact, the liberties afforded us in our Constitution have afforded Americans the ability to witness first hand the pitfalls of materialism run amuck.  This experience, and the freedoms still afforded us, give us a unique perspective from which to correct our course, as well as the power.  Perhaps the greatest majesty of our American tradition of ordered liberty is that we are all free, individually and institutionally, to look into the mirror and make the changes necessary.  It is this power, properly wielded, that will win the war against terrorism as well as bring back our economy.

Having gained so much, we have so much to lose and American’s will not let go easily.    It is the same determination which lead us to erect the Hoover Damn, the Empire State Building and the interstate highway system, that will empower us to overcome the current economic crisis, avoid future recessions and win the war on terror.

But first- back to the mirror.  We are currently making a lot of mistakes, and unfortunately money seems to be the governing factor in our rash decisions.  For starters, we are cutting education – an extremely short-sited, reckless and irresponsible response to our financial crisis.  I will delve into that in a later chapter.  

Here’s an interesting example of money overriding our logic: California passed SB 1449 on October 1, 2010, reducing the possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a civil infraction where the person in possession is slapped with the equivalent of a mere parking ticket.  The reasons sited by Governor Schwarzenneger were the cost to police the illegal drug and the possibility of raising tax revue if it were to be fully legalized and regulated.  Both of these are valid considerations, no question.  However, the problem is this:  the decision to ostensibly legalize the drug was made solely on fiscal grounds without proper consideration of the effects of the drug or why it was made illegal in the first place.  Now, to be fair, marijuana is not cocaine or meth, and its effects arguably are not even as bad as alcohol.  A valid argument for marijuana’s legalization on the basis of its effects versus alcohol can certainly be made, but the decision to legalize it in California was based solely on monetary concerns.  This is wrong!  If money is the only consideration, the same argument can be made for the legalization of all narcotics.  The same reasoning has been utilized in California to justify the release of criminals convicted of assault with a deadly weapon, battery, domestic violence, and attacks on children. 

It is unforuntaely quite clear that the tactic being employed by radical Islam, namely to destroy our economy, is effective.  In many respects, it is forcing us to turn on our own moral compass.  Why, because it is hard to stay moral when it comes down to dog eat dog.  They know this to be human nature.  We must not let this happen, because the more we allow this to occur, the more we are at risk of civil unrest, revolution, loss of freedom, and a continuous wave of crisis that will lead to us turning on ourselves and our institutions.  Divide and conquer!

Radical Islam abhors our freedom above all else.  It therefore aims to force us to erode the freedoms protected in our Constitution for the sake of our security, because it is in a tyrannical system where freedoms are forgotten and the individual is nothing that their fanatical worldview can take root.  

Unfortunately, they have already begun to succeed.  In reaction to their terror, our freedoms have been truncated under the Patriot Act and our personal boundaries are being invaded by humiliating pat downs.  The government has created a vast domestic spying network to collect information about Americans in the wake of 9/11 and subsequent terror plots.  An immense network of over four thousand counter-terrorism organizations utilizing state and local law enforcement agencies to collect information about thousands of US residents has been created to feed information to Washington for analysis.  Big Brother is upon us!  Is it necessary?  Yes, unfortunately.  But we must not allow it to go too far – if we haven’t already.

Daily they are forcing us to decide what freedoms we are willing to forego and where to draw the line.  While many of us will say we don’t mind giving up a little bit of our freedoms for the sake of security, the issue arises when we find ourselves on the slippery slope to foregoing too many of those freedoms to a government that becomes immune to habeas corpus.  It is on this slippery slope that we already find ourselves, and we must be careful not to allow the protections our forefathers fought for to be swept away out of fear.   That is what the terrorists want.

Our history from 9/11 on shows us that the longer the war on terror continues, the more pervasive we allow it to become, the greater number of rights and personal freedoms the government will find it necessary to overwrite for the sake of our own security.  This, in and of itself, makes the war on terror one where time is very much of the essence.  We must therefore act decisively and expeditiously to push radical Islam back and eradicate this threat. 

Stage one to winning the war on terror, as I have mentioned, is to revamp and revitalize our economy.

If you look at Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs, the sub-prime lending crisis, the collapse of the Celtic Tiger, Greek debt, all the way back to our very own dot.com burst, and even the savings and loan crisis, we must realize that what we are dealing with is far bigger than these individual crisis themselves.  We are dealing with a fundamental shift in the way the world economy operates.  While for two hundred years America and Europe dominated world production, investment, manufacturing, and exports, Asia is now out-producing us.  Instinctively, many have called for protectionist policies in reaction to this truth, but this is unwise.  

As a result of production, Asia’s economy, most notably China’s economy, is growing leaps and bounds just as ours did post-World War II.  Consequently, Asia’s consumer market is estimated to be twice that of ours by 2020, and therein lies our opportunity. 

The first step to dealing with the current financial crisis was to stop it from becoming another Great Depression.  To that end, TARP, and all the subsequent bailouts have been aimed at stopping the bleeding.  Arguably, they have succeeded, for now- but they are mere band-aids covering a massive laceration because they are propping up arcane business models and industries that now serve only as relics of America’s past industrial strength.   The proof in this assertion is the fact that despite all the government “stimulus” unemployment continues to rise. 

Stage two to dealing with the current financial crisis is to get the global financial systems working properly, and in tandem with reality, a task that hinges on stage three – reducing unemployment, and fostering growth through economic policy geared toward encouraging capital investment and production. 

I have absolute faith that we can meet this challenge.  We already have the brand names and the custom built products recognized around the world, and when you combine that with the advantage of having the most innovative and technologically advanced economy in the world along with the most creative talent in the world, we absolutely have it within our power to rise to the occasion.  The re-birth of the American Dream in this generation is possible and the way we do it is by tapping into our native genius and creative talent to produce high technology goods for the remainder of the world.  We must ride out to meet the challenges presented by the growth of a middle class in India and Asia and capitalize on their consumer needs.  Our salvation is in producing these high technology goods to satiate our own domestic consumption as well as for export to the remainder of the world, for doing so will satisfy the basic economic law of supply and demand. 

PLEASE STAY TUNED FOR PART TWO OF CHAPTER SIX: THE WAR ON TERRORISM!

 

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CHAPTER FIVE: ABORTION

 “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, And before you were born I consecrated you; I have appointed you a prophet to the nations.” 

  Jeremiah 1:5

The controversy surrounding abortion law is as dividing as the rift between Civil War North and South regarding the issue of slavery in America.   It is a an extremely important subject, especially for the “Right Wing Christian Conservative Block”, as it is called.  And the legal nuances inherent in the matter often dominate the decision process in the appointment of Justices to our highest court. 

Before I delve into my position on the matter of abortion, though, I feel it is important to point out that the amount of influence the issue has on our decisions to back candidates is often counterproductive, and in my opinion, distracting.  Particularly, in the Republican Party, I have found that far too many members absolutely will not even consider voting for a candidate that shares 99% of their virtuous beliefs and political foresight if they are not 100% Pro-Life.  Quite literally, stating that you are Pro-Choice in the Republican Party is political suicide.

On the one hand, this steadfast adherence to an issue such as abortion is praiseworthy and I hope that the fight continues to further restrict abortions across our great nation.  On the other hand, as a result of this issue, the Republican Party has become entirely too one-issue oriented.  This is an impediment to the Republican Party’s ability to implement its proper platform on all other issues as we are losing the vote of the common person more concerned with the economy, education, and the environment.

Here is the perfect example:  I sat down to lunch with a client and friend of mine recently.  He is a 90 year old Republican who ran his own dental office for almost as many years and co-founded the McLean Bible Church in Vienna, Virginia.  Extremely devout, I often tease him that he should have been a preacher. 

We got to talking about politics and religion as we always do, and the issue of abortion came up.  His view on abortion is that it is always, unequivocally a sin to abort a child unless there is extreme danger to the mother.  Every single time the subject comes up, he falls back on the Bible passages of Jeremiah 1:5:

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, And before you were born I consecrated you; I have appointed you a prophet to the nations.” 

His argument, ostensibly, is that a human being exists at the very point of conception, and therefore its abortion is tantamount to murder if there is not extreme justification.  

Playing devil’s advocate, I asked the following hypothetical:  If you were a Senator, would you vote for legislation that does allow abortions, but further restricts abortions by requiring all women over the age of 18 to prove risk to their health for their abortion to be legal?

He responded as anticipated – Absolutely not!  I countered, arguing that at least it would be a step in the right direction.  To that I was satisfied to gain his concurrence.  However, many in the Republican Party take the counterproductive stance that any abortion is wrong, and therefore would look past this proposed “step in the right direction.”  This type of stubborn mindset is is holding progress hostage – not just as it applies to abortion laws, but also to the remainder of the Republican Platform. 

So, what am I?  Am I Pro-Life or Pro-Choice?  Before I answer, let me note a very real problem in contemporary politics – too many conservatives won’t even listen to a candidate who says he is Pro-Life but believes abortions are proper under some circumstances.  Upon a further elucidation of the facts and moral considerations, however, I believe most  would actually agree that there is a proper, LEGAL, threshold. 

Therefore, I am bold to say, that I am absolutely Pro-Life, however, I do believe that abortions are sometimes an unfortunate necessity and our government does not and ought not have the authority to regulate it to the level of abolishing the practice altogether.  Allow me to explain: 

The paramount case concerning abortion law, unquestionably, is Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973).   The Supreme Court determined that a right to privacy afforded by the due process clause in the Fourteenth Amendment extends to a woman’s choice to have an abortion.  However, the court maintained that the mother’s right to privacy must be balanced against the state’s two legitimate interests for regulating abortions: protecting prenatal life and protecting the mother’s health.

Arguing that the state interests mature over the course of a pregnancy, the Court resolved this balancing test by tying state regulation of abortion to the mother’s trimester of pregnancy.  The Court later rejected Roe’s trimester framework, but continues to affirm its central holding that one has a right to abortion up until viability, which the court defined as being “potentially able to live outside the mother’s womb, albeit with artificial aid,” adding that viability “is usually placed at about seven months (28 weeks) but may occur earlier.”

Defenders of Roe argue that case precedent prior to the decision delineated a sphere of private interests and that at the core of that sphere is the right of the individual to make the fundamental decisions that shape family life: with whom to marry; whether and when to have children, etc.  However, I would argue regulation of abortion would not be virtually impossible without the most outrageous sort of government prying into the privacy of the home – which was the sole rationale in Roe’s antecedent case of Griswold v. Connecticut, 181 U.S. 479 (1965) where the Supreme Court invalidated only a certain portion of Connecticut law that proscribed the use, as opposed to the manufacture, sale or other distribution of contraceptives.

It is clear that the government would have to sneak into the privacy of the bedroom to determine whether or not contraceptives were being used and it is equally as clear that such privacies must not be invaded without extreme exception.  Abortion, on the other hand, is something that can and is “monitored” outside the bedroom and instead in the doctor’s office. Clearly, the level of privacy is much less intimate, though arguably, not necessarily less personal.

However, I believe the debate surrounding the right to privacy as it pertains to abortion law is actually misguided.  To begin, one might argue that the protection of a woman’s right to privately abort her child is synonymous to the protection of a woman’s right to murder her spouse in the privacy of her basement.  Clearly the government has the right, in fact the mandate to intervene in the latter.  What is the difference between the two?  It comes down to the true issue at the center of the abortion debate – at what point should the law consider abortion as tantamount to unjustifiable homicide?  In other words, when are you committing the murder of a living person?

I believe the decision in Roe was fundamentally flawed.  In reaching their decision, the Supreme Court skirted the issue of unjustifiable homicide, writing, “We need not resolve the difficult question of when life begins.  When those trained in medicine, philosophy, and theology are unable to arrive at any consensus, the judiciary, at this point in the development of man’s knowledge, in not in a position to speculate as to the answer.” 

The “difficult” question, though, is central to the state’s compelling interest of protecting prenatal life, and it is fundamental to the debate surrounding the issue of abortion altogether.  Therefore, the Supreme Court erred in ignoring the question.

By ignoring the issue of life and when a fetus becomes a person, the court was able to shift the debate toward a red herring – privacy.  They focused on the privacy of the pregnant woman and her right to chose whether or not to carry the child to term or terminate.  The harm that the State would impose upon the pregnant woman by denying the choice altogether, the court argued, is evident.  Maternity or additional offspring might force upon the woman a distressful life and future, mental and physical health might be taxed in childcare and there is also the problem of bringing an unwanted child into the world, among others. 

To be clear, I believe that these are compelling concerns.  In fact, I cannot even begin to put a value on saving a child from the horrors of growing up unwanted and unloved.  And it is unfortunate when a woman becomes pregnant, is abandoned by the father, and her life is ruined financially, socially and often times, spiritually.  Further, proponents of abortion will rely on the sudden decrease in crime as a result of abortions, pointing out that since less unwanted children were born, less crack dealers, murderers, etc., were roaming the streets twenty years after the decision in Roe.  A popular book, Freakonomics, has an entire chapter dedicated to that very phenomenon. 

What it boils down to, in my opinion, is this: Roe’s notion that the state’s interest in protecting prenatal life is trumped by a woman’s constitutional right to privacy in deciding whether or not to terminate a pregnancy, is not only erroneous, but it runs utterly afoul of basic morality and the most fundamental of constitutional guarantees – the right to life. 

Does the right to privacy exist?  Yes, and I believe, undeniably.  Also, I ardently believe that the state must not have the right to interfere in one’s privacy.  That is, unless the state has a compelling interest and the regulation is narrowly tailored to address that legitimate interest.  In regards to abortion, the state has a compelling interest, and that is the protection of life. Yet the states have been injudiciously deprived of their sovereign right to police that compelling interest as each state sees fit.    

Morality is the real issue.  Abortion may in fact be “good” for the economy insofar as unwanted children are not brought up in ghettos, crime is proximately curtailed, and the population is controlled, but to champion the right to abort a child in the name of these economic windfalls is disingenuous to who we must be as Americans.  Should we legalize crack cocaine and LSD because it would cost us less not to police it?  Clearly not, because of the harm these drugs are known to have on the user, but more importantly, the harm it causes the user to voluntarily or otherwise inflict on those around them.  Why then should we allow a woman to kill a human being purely for economic concern?  We should not. 

It is obvious that the state has a compelling interest in making it illegal for me to kill my next door neighbor for slandering me, despite the fact that his defamation of my character is causing me extreme mental anguish and possible economic hardship.  So why is it that the state cannot regulate the killing of a fetus?  Because it is not a person?! 

Despite first declining to resolve the question of when life begins in reaching its decision, the court in Roe spent considerable time persuading itself that a fetus is in fact not a person as defined in the Constitution and therefore is not protected as to its right to life.  In their analysis of all the contexts in the Constitution in which the word “person” was used, the court was correct in finding no indication that it had any possible pre-natal application.  They wrote, “all this, together with our observation that throughout the major portion of the 19th century prevailing legal abortion practices were far freer than they are today (in 1973) persuades us that the word “person”, as used in the Fourteenth Amendment, does not include the unborn.”  

The court erred here as well.  To begin, while the word “person” is never defined to include the unborn within the four corners of the Constitution, the converse is equally as true – the Constitution does not expressly remove the unborn from the definition.  And as to abortion laws being “freer” at the time of ratification – are not the protections of personhood afforded African Americans despite the fact that slavery was rampant when the Constitution was drafted?  Could it be, that despite all their collective genius, the founding fathers simply did not think to define person? 

Next, the court turned to legal precedent, arguing that the law of torts and inheritance, for instance, has been reluctant to endorse any theory that life begins before live birth or to accord legal rights to the unborn except in narrowly defined situations and except when the rights are contingent upon live birth.  However, consider this: aside from natural miscarriage, wouldn’t the fetus live and be born but for the intervening abortion?   To terminate the pregnancy, you must kill the fetus.  Logically, does this not mean that there is life being terminated? 

So, an abortion, boiled down to its logical absurdum, is the intentional killing of a living organism that, without intervention, will become a human being.   Who, then, is the court to decide that a human being, which the state has a compelling interest in protecting, exists only upon viability?  Scientifically speaking, yes, the fetus cannot survive as a human outside the womb prior to viability, albeit with artificial assistance, but abortion terminates the further development of that fetus when it naturally could have reached viability.  

The question then, is not one of privacy, but rather one of a compelling interest in protecting life.  It is not the place of the Supreme Court to decide when the compelling interest of protecting life begins or ends.  Rather, this is a question that ought to be left to the individual states.  The protection of the life is properly a decision that must be made by each state’s moral majority through the branches of each state’s independent representative government.  Therefore, it is my opinion that the court’s decision in Roe exceeded the judiciary’s proper Constitutional reach and should be overturned.  

Each state ought to be left to decide for themselves whether or not their interest is strong enough to regulate abortions prior to viability.  Why?  Because the constituents of each state can decide for themselves as to when life begins and when life should or should not be protected as pitted against the concerns of the mother.  The moral majority, which I hope would adhere to the belief that life begins at conception, would determine the appropriate level of regulation propounded by their state legislatures.  This is the true spirit of our democracy. 

The court itself said that it cannot determine when life begins.  Therefore it must not be permitted to tell the states that their constituents’ belief that life begins at conception is erroneous and therefore not compelling.  

Pro-choice advocates argue that the right to privacy at issue is the woman’s interest in having control over her own body and bodily integrity and, therefore, this privacy is one that is of even greater importance than the right to be left alone in the home.  To an extent, I agree.  But they are missing the point entirely.  They are seeing only one side of the issue presented. 

The state absolutely should not have the power to require a woman to have a child.  However, the state does and ought to have the power to regulate against homicide.

There are situations, such as self defense, where homicide is justifiable at law.  For similar reasons, I do believe that abortion is sometimes, though narrowly, justifiable.  

First, and foremost, in the case of rape, I believe that the woman, having not made the conscious and voluntary decision to engage in intercourse, should not be required to carry a child to term.   To do so would perpetuate a second wrong on the pregnant victim by requiring her to endure the physical, mental and social consequences of a pregnancy not a corollary of her action. 

Let us then look at the issue of abortion through another lens:  Sentience.  Sentience is defined as the state of having the power of perception by the senses; consciousness.

When a woman makes the conscious decision to engage in intercourse, she voluntarily assumes the risk of pregnancy.  Having assumed that risk, and having become pregnant, her decision to abort the unwanted child is one to kill a life in being, albeit one arguably without sentience.   What we have, then, is a helpless life that has been brought into being without consent and killed by a sentient woman unable to own up to her mistake.  I believe it is absolutely fair for a state to determine that they have an interest in protecting the helpless life over the privacy concerns of the imprudent mother. 

In the case of rape, however, the mother has not been imprudent insofar as assuming the risk of pregnancy as a consequence of intercourse.  What we have, then, is a matured, sentient woman in whom the family and also the state have already invested, pitted against an insentient fetus.   It is proper for the court determine that the matured woman’s right to privacy outweighs the fetus’ right to life. 

This brings me to the very question I posed to my friend at lunch:  If you were a Senator, would you vote for legislation that does allow abortions, but further restricts abortions by requiring all women over the age of 18 to prove risk to their health for their abortion to be legal? 

In one form or another, all states have statutory rape laws on their books.  The theory behind statutory rape, with respect to a minor female, is that she is too young to give true, voluntary consent to intercourse because of her innocence and ignorance, among other factors, and therefore intercourse with her is without consent – statutorily defined as rape. 

I ask you this then:  what if a 16 year old girl engages in intercourse with her boyfriend and gets pregnant?  Logically, it follows that she did not give true, voluntary consent to the intercourse and that because of her naivety she did not truly assume the risk of pregnancy through her actions.  

In this case – that is the case of a minor, as defined by state statute, becoming pregnant – I posit that it would be constitutionally impermissible for the state to ban the abortion altogether.  Here, the innocence of the minor mitigates against her culpability, and her decision to have or not to have a child, her right to privacy, could be argued to outweigh the compelling state interest of preserving prenatal life, just as in the case of rape.  

Now, having said the above, it is important to note that there are instances when even minors are to be treated like an adult in the eyes of the law and the same should apply in the case of abortion.  By way of example, a 16 year old boy can be tried as an adult for murder.  What of the pregnant 16 year old: can she be treated as an adult and her abortion outlawed except to protect her health?  Quite possibly, yes, but it is the state legislatures, not the Supreme Court that should make that determination.

CHAPTER FOUR:

RELIGION IN GOVERNMENT

Whereas Almighty God hath created the mind free; that all attempts to influence it by temporal punishment or burthens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the Holy author of our religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was his Almighty power to do . .
Be it enacted by the General Assembly, that no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities . .
And though we well know that this assembly elected by the people for the ordinary purposes of legislation only, have no power to restrain the act of succeeding assemblies, constituted with powers equal to our own, and that therefore to declare this act to be irrevocable would be of no effect in law; yet we are free to declare, and do declare, that the rights hereby asserted are of the natural rights of mankind, and that if any act shall be hereafter passed to repeal the present, or to narrow its operation, such as would be an infringement of natural right.

— “THE VIRGINIA STATUTE OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM”, drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1777 and enacted by the Virginia General Assembly in 1786.

Thomas Jefferson’s greatest known work is the Declaration of Independence, which he penned in 1776. However, his subsequent drafting of the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom in 1779 arguably rivals his earlier work through its clarity of faithful thought and intellectual acuity. In fact, our third president was thought to have been most proud of the statute.

A precursor to the First Amendment, the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom is a statement concerning freedom of conscience and the principle of partition between church and state. In it Jefferson begins with a statement of natural right, a decree of his Deism – that is, the belief that God created the world and along with it, man’s capacity to govern himself. Jefferson believed that God, as creator, granted us freedom of choice, including liberty of conscience in religious matters and that any attempt to restrict it is misguided. Building from that foundation, the act itself states that no person can be compelled to attend any church or support it with his taxes, and that all shall be free to worship or not worship as he pleases with no discrimination at law.

We are to do as governors of men, as God does: allow freedom to reign supreme, regardless of whether we have the power to force others to believe as we do. Freedom of thought, freedom of religion, freedom to fail – Freedom!

Whereas Almighty God hath created the mind free; that all attempts to influence it by temporal punishment or burthens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the Holy author of our religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was his Almighty power to do . . .

Thomas Jefferson – “Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom” — 1777

Jefferson could have stopped there, but his genius propelled him to address the dangers that could arise as a result of the people’s proper right to change the law through their elected assemblies. Jefferson realized that the statute is not irrevocable because no law is, or ought to be. Because future assemblies are free to repeal or circumscribe the statute, Jefferson warned, appropriately, that any such circumscribing assembly would do so at their own peril, as to do so would be, “an infringement of natural right.

Today in America, we unfortunately find that Jefferson’s concern is coming to fruition. Americans of all religions suddenly now find themselves well down that slippery slope to no longer being religiously free, and by dint thereof, free at all!

The infringement upon each American’s natural right to be free in his religious practice is not being caused by the outright repeal of the First Amendment, but rather a circumscription of that freedom is rising from a chronic misapplication and material misunderstanding of the amendment’s true edict. As a result, we are witnessing a nationwide deterioration of the morality that served as the guiding principles in the formulation of our Constitution.

Family values, self worth and motivation, even the very lines between right and wrong are blurring, drowned out by the hustle and bustle of an increasingly frantic society too strained to stop and realize what they are losing, a government injudicious as to its purpose, and to a large extent – it all comes at the misguided behest of our nation’s “over-political correctness.”

More so now than ever, we are faced with a new type of religious America. “We the people,” has an entirely different scope than it did when our founding fathers wrote the Constitution. Spurred by the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, people from all over the world, not just Europe, have come to our shores, bringing with them their traditions and faiths. The religious creeds of the world – Islam, Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Sikh, etc., all now call America home and the United States now exists as the most religiously diverse society since the dawn of civilization. The percentage of foreign born Americans has doubled from the 1970’s to over 10.5% of the population, with the Hispanic and Asian populations growing the fastest. It is truly a modern miracle.

It is our system of ordered liberty, commanding protection of the inalienable rights of those immigrants through ten fundamental rights, that has made this miracle possible on Earth. Men, women and children of all faiths live in the same neighborhoods, attend the same schools – but in America, unlike all civilizations before us, we do so in relative peace.

The Bill of Rights begins with the First Amendment, a decree that man shall not be converted by the sword. And it is through an innate, if not subconscious understanding of the Amendment’s true meaning, that Americans eagerly greet morally grounded faiths with open arms.

However, our selfless attempts to embrace these faiths and traditions with open arms have transformed into an over-zealous, and often imprudent passion to always be “politically correct”. It is going too far, and as a result we are quickly losing what it means to be an American.

The idea of religious freedom is central to the very idea of America. Religious freedom has always given rise to religious diversity, and never, in any nation on this planet, has there been such religious diversity as there currently is in the United States. We lead the rest of the world by this example, as a living, breathing testament to the power of ordered liberty. We should see that we are therefore in a unique position to create a truly pluralist society in which this grand diversity is not merely tolerated but embraced as the very source of our strength.

In order to do so – in order to avoid a collapse from within, though, we must understand the deepest meaning of our founding principles, with full acknowledgment that our system of ordered liberty is steeply grounded in faith, particularly Judeo-Christian morality. Instead, an errant, liberal ideology has permeated academia and deceived our judicial system. We are erroneously being taught that the First Amendment’s establishment clause means that the United States must purge all signs of religion from the public square.

Lawsuits to enjoin the local public library from displaying the Ten Commandments bombard the airwaves. In 2002 the 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals declared the phrase “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance, to be unconstitutional. An agenda that includes tearing down crosses, prohibiting crèches and menorahs on public property, indeed the absolute removal of God and faith from the public square is sweeping our land.

Many argue that it is a secular socialist machine that’s waging this war on religion because they see any religious worldview as the single greatest threat to their realization of a utopia where government is all powerful. Certainly some may fit that mold, but I believe the problem has a less insidious root.

A very real affront to religion, particularly the practice of Christianity in the public square, is growing out of most people’s desire to be politically correct, and despite the fact that they themselves are often religious. Why the particular assault on Christianity? Because Christianity was here first – it is the “establishment.” Those desirous of being politically correct tend to admonish the majority representing the establishment. Unfortunately, this lends to reverse-political incorrectness, where the majority is discriminated against and, ironically, they fail to speak up for fear of being seen as politically incorrect themselves. This “catch-22” phenomenon is similar to Caucasians, representing the majority and “establishment”, enduring reverse racism as a natural reaction to generations of long overdue political correctness.

All generations, regardless of race, wealth, or religion, inherit the consequences of their parents’ deeds.

We can all relate to this situation: invariably a person at the table says they aren’t religious, and you shouldn’t impose your beliefs on him. Unfortunately, so many of us simply shy away from the subject, knowing there is no way to convince this man that there is a God, much less that our God is the correct one to worship. But what happens when that man’s gripe begins to have the force of law, affirmatively denying us the right to respond? Must we not then stand up?

The problem is that this political correctness gone awry is creating a court enforced wall of separation between the true historical spirit of America and a radically different, secular America without God, traditional values, or an understanding of its own history. In an attempt not to discriminate, or show favoritism toward one religion, we find ourselves removing all faiths from the public sphere. This none or all approach, where no religion is allowed for fear of retribution from others, is catastrophic to the future of America and her system of ordered liberty.

We must take a stand, and do so with an understanding of our history and the importance of maintaining religion in the public sphere!

Therefore, let me begin with a rhetorical quiz:

Question: Why is it difficult to draft regulation that envisions every possible scenario and clearly addresses them in black and white?
A. Because someone always finds or creates a loophole, effectively skirting the law by hiding in creative gray areas; or
B. Because humans are stupid.

The answer, unfortunately is A.

The truth results from the ironic paradox created by man’s natural drive to aspire for a better future. It is our basic instinct to out-maneuver each other and gain the tactical advantage in our struggles for survival. These desires, combined with phenomenal intellect, form the backbone of innovation, indeed American capitalism. A desire to build a better home and future for our family drives us, and the freedom to do so is protected by our Constitution. The result is the most industrious nation on the planet.

Unfortunately, those same animalistic instincts can, and too often are, utilized to subvert the law. Hypothetically, let’s say that in response to the outcries for campaign finance reform, a regulation passes through Congress mandating that no single candidate can receive more than 2% of their campaign spending money from any single donor or corporation. The regulation is even concise as to the definition of “corporation”, setting out subsets to include LLC’s, S-Corps, charitable organizations, subsidiaries, affiliates, etc.

It is only a matter of time before some of those organizations, desirous for whatever reason to circumvent that law, team up with others to form a faction designed to exert more influence than their competitor. They will form the next version of a political action committee if necessary, binding together to further their special interests. At first, they will weasel into gray areas. Eventually, they will break the law outright and have either convinced Congress to rescind or simply not enforce the law. This necessitates more regulation, further restriction of freedom, and so goes the vicious downward cycle.

The point I am making is this:

“We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion . . . Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

–John Adams, 2nd President, Signor of the Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights.

As a consequence of liberty, man must be responsible to govern himself. An immoral man will not abide by any regulation no matter how brilliantly crafted, for he is motivated by his very nature to circumvent that law’s application. A moral man, however, will stop at the temptation to evade the legislation if it means infringing upon the rights of others or unjustly taking advantage.

Today, we have lost sight of the need for morality in our people as a whole. We’ve all noticed it, and it is frightening. It’s not just that people are too busy or rude to acknowledge you as they pass on the street anymore; it’s that they are isolated and afraid. And in this isolation, immorality finds its breading ground.

Honorable people ask what they can do for their country, not what their country can do for them. Ethical people work hard for what they have, and do not expect or feel entitled to receive welfare. And while it is a just and altruistic goal to provide welfare for those in need, it is an immoral, unmotivated person that will game those programs to take advantage. Multiply this dishonest individual into millions, and they will bankrupt the system. This is what we face today in America, and the dearth in morality is cracking the foundation upon which the pillars of our civilization are built.

The cultural history of Western Civilization enlightens us as to the true meaning of what it is to be an American and what America must remember to stand for as the last best hope for humanity. This historical journey illuminates the legislative intent behind the First Amendment and equips us with the knowledge and power to forge a more perfect union for us all – a safer, cleaner, more affluent and more virtuous America.

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution reads as follows:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

By the black letter of this law, it is facially clear that nothing has been laid down in our Constitution to prohibit the free exercise of speech in regards to religion in the public sector. So then, what does it mean?

The Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom demonstrates our founding fathers’ very clear understanding that government must not have the power over the conscience of the governed to force them to worship God. However, the founding fathers also believed that government and its institutions derive their power to command from God and do so under God in that, through his own free will, he has chosen to allow us the freedom to govern ourselves without his interference.

It is this second tenement as to the role of God in our government that is too often swept under the rug by those that do not consider themselves religious. The exact freedom that protects the non-religious from legal injustices is the same freedom that protects the religious right to proclaim and celebrate faith in public without persecution.

Predominantly, if not entirely Christian, our founding fathers formed their view of God’s role in government, in part, from the Bible. Romans 13:1-6 state as follows:

“Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves. For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong. Do you want to be free from fear of the one in authority? Then do what is right and you will be commended. For the one in authority is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for rulers do not bear the sword for no reason. They are God’s servants, agents of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer. Therefore, it is necessary to submit to the authorities, not only because of possible punishment but also as a matter of conscience. This is also why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing.”

The Bible enlightened our founding fathers to the truth that government and its institutions derive their power to command from God and do so under God. Inspired by their creed’s very cannon, they declared the self-evident truth that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, and that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It is by this faith that our dollar bill states “In God we trust.”

Our founding fathers also realized that liberty was the true purpose of man’s government over man, but that maintenance of liberty and justice over a free people requires virtue:

 “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible” –George Washington.
 “So great is my veneration for the Bible that the earlier my children begin to read it the more confident will be my hope that they will prove useful citizens of their country and respectable members of society…” –John Quincy Adams.
 “That book, sir, is the rock on which our republic rests” –Andrew Jackson.
 “We have staked the whole future of American civilization not on the power of government… not in the Constitution… (but) upon the capacity of each and every one of us to govern ourselves according to the Ten Commandments” –James Madison.

Our American way of thinking, though born of faith, evolved out of Western Civilization. Studying the cultures, their politics and struggles, helps us understand the majesty of Judeo-Christian morality and what it must mean for us today.

The original settlers came to America to practice their religious beliefs free from the dogma of the established churches. The Puritans came to create a “city on the hill” to shine as a beacon of religious piety. The Pilgrims and Quakers too came to found new religious communities.

The Europe they fled, and from which they gleaned centuries of unique insight, had a long tradition of religious persecution. The ebb and flow of Western Civilization from the Dark Ages of religious absolutism to the humanism and self-awareness of the Renaissance, for example, steeped our American settlers in a rich and tumultuous history out of which our founding fathers were enlightened. Their forefathers had lived through the Crusades, the Papal Schism, the Protestant Reformation and the ecclesiastical and structural reconfigurations of the Catholic Church in the Counter-Reformation that culminated in the Thirty Years War. They’d endured the combination of higher taxes, unsuccessful wars and conflicts with the Pope that lead to the Barons forcing King John of England to agree to the Magna Carta.

Braving the icy clutches of the Atlantic, our forefathers left Europe with a very clear understanding that the Ten Commandments, moral mandates they so fervently believed in, were paramount and critical not only to self-governance, but to the operation of a just government. Europe’s war torn history also taught them that religious intolerance, blind dogma and conversion by the sword are the greatest enemies of liberty.

The unique condition of Western Civilization, properly studied, enlightened our forefathers as to the greatest dichotomy of all. Religion, faith, morality and virtues are indespensible to the operaiton of government over a free people, while governments must not establish any law to require the practice of or abolishion of any religion- for to do so risks sectarian violence and the very destruciton of liberty.

This mindset is wholy in accord with the Bible. Romans 13:8, which immediately precedes the declaration that governments derive their right to command men through God, states as follows:

“Let no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for whoever loves others has fulfilled the law. The commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You shall not covet,” and whatever other command there may be, are summed up in this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no harm to a neighbor. Therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.”

Being that love is the fulfillment of the law because it does no harm to your neighbor, it follows logically that one man must not take up the sword to convert his fellow man in the name of the Lord and certainly not in the name of the law. Truly, as Thomas Helwys wrote in A Short Declaration of the Mystery of Iniquity: “For men’s religion to God is between God and themselves. The king shall not answer for it. Let them be heretics, Turks, Jews, or whatsoever, it appertains not to the earthly power to punish them in the least measure.”

The principles learned from the Ten Commandments and studied by our forefathers – those virtues are the foundation of Judeo-Christian morality. This religious background, a centering of the Lord’s teaching that one is not to convert by the sword, that one is to respect the law, against the historical backdrop of Western Civilization, from the Middle Ages to our Revolutionary War, educated our founding fathers as to the need for the First Amendment. Learning from history, they did not, and would not have written God from the public sector. To do so would run contrary to the lessons of history from which they gleaned, and run afoul of their true belief that liberty must be ordered and that order hinges upon virtue.

It was a religious revival in the 1730s known as the Great Awakening that stirred our founding fathers to fight for their God given inalienable rights. It was also a spiritual resurgence in the nineteenth century that inspired the abolitionists’ drive to end slavery.

Remember that the marching song of the Union Army during the Civil War, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, included the line “as Christ died to make men holy, let us die to make men free.”

It was also a religious revival that led to a seventy year women’s suffrage struggle culminating in the ratification of the 19th Amendment to our Constitution, prohibiting state and federal agencies from adopting gender-based restrictions on voting. And it was a Baptist minister, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and delivered his, I Have a Dream, speech that lead to civil rights being extended to African Americans.

The impetus behind these virtuous movements throughout the history of America are all found in an underlying Judeo-Christian morality. It is from the Ten Commandments that our system of ordered liberty pulls most strongly, and to turn our backs on that is tantamount to denouncing who we are as a nation.

Now, I am not saying that one must be Christian or Jewish to be an American. Not at all. And I’m also not arguing that there is no morality aside from religious derivation. Rather, I am pointing out the importance of these faiths as they were of paramount inspiration to the declaration of our independence and the penning of our Constitution. In our history lies the answers as to addressing our present and future obstacles as a free and ordered people – as moral Americans.

It is clear that morality has very strong roots in religion: Islam, Christianity, Judaism, etc. These faiths are centered on virtues; teach morality and compassion, the rule of law, and deference to a benevolent, higher power. But the growing intolerance toward the free expression of religious beliefs in the public square, in order to protect the sensibilities of the non-religious, presents a very clear and present danger to the continuation of our society’s moral compass.

Freedom of religion does not mean freedom from religion. “Political correctness,” has run afoul of this understanding, and it has reached a boiling point where attempts to appease those with different or no religious beliefs are now met with an intolerance at law toward the practice of Christianity and Judaism, the religions that serve as the cornerstone of traditional American liberty. That same intolerance is now turned to Islam in the aftermath of 9/11.

We must understand, and understand clearly, that this nation of ours, our system of ordered liberty, the right of every American to live free to pursue happiness, would not have been possible without the lessons of Western Civilization’s history. Their faith in the Ten Commandments and their enduring through religious crusades and tyranny, resulting in a patent understanding of the Lord’s word, form the Judeo-Christian morality out of which our Constitution was written. The United States of America is a nation able to host all the world’s religions, peacefully, where each is free to practice their creed without interference at law or bloodshed, because of the founding father’s historical, cultural, and religious wisdom – that, my fellow Americans, is God’s Manifest Destiny!

And so, while it is not necessary that you be Christian or Jewish to be an American, to be an American, you and your neighbors must be morally grounded. Therefore, it is requisite for our generation to stand up and fight for the true protections our First Amendment was drafted to afford each and every one of us. We must fight to win back our God given right to practice our religion and pronounce our faith in the public square, pushing back every judicial decision and public outcry to circumscribe that most American and first of our affirmed liberties. Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism – all morally grounded faiths are rightfully declared in the public square. The future of our nation depends on it!

The above described understanding as to the role of Judeo-Christian morality as it pertains to our American sense of freedom, and the extent to which we as Americans stay true to those ideals, will be critical in determining the outcome of a number of contemporary political issues facing our nation. This is because the key to prevailing in each issue exists in our American virtues. While this could be said of almost any topic, I am in particular talking about abortion and the war on terrorism.

I will discuss abortion and the war on terrorism in the following two chapters.

Merry Christmas!

LEADING BY EXAMPLE: RETURNING OUR REPUBLIC TO ITS REVOLUTIONARY ROOTS

 

INTRODUCTION:

THE AMERICAN DREAM

“The American Dream is that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement…it is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.”

– James Truslow Adams in “American Dream”, 1931.

            The American Dream is more than a patriotic, national ethos.  At its roots, the American Dream is a core belief in the unique opportunity being a citizen of the United States affords each American; that our unyielding democratic ideals are a promise of prosperity for our people. 

            The notion of the American Dream itself is derived from the circumstances giving rise to the very birth or our great nation, in the way our American colonies declared themselves dissolved of the political shackles which had long bound them to the tyrannical hand of Britain.  This unprecedented leap of faith was the first step toward the realization of a free, yet governed people, and it made the American Dream possible.

          The second sentence of the Declaration of Independence so boldly and brilliantly states that,  “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

            This core belief in the unalienable rights of the individual, that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the people, is not only one of the guiding principles so brilliantly propounded by the founding fathers into the framework of America’s ordered liberty, it is the pillar upon which this great nation has built the most influential, powerful, free and wealthy society this planet has ever hosted.

            It is the idea that if one works hard enough, if he or she is willing to roll up their sleeves, society should leave the individual free to reach his or her full potential.  This philosophy, this potent and powerful mind-set, undeniably, is the backbone of America’s success, for it is the blood, sweat and tears of the individual that has engineered our nation’s prosperity. 

           The American tradition of protecting and promoting this just and capitalistic mindset, coalesced with ordered liberty, has proven to be our recipe for success.  It’s changed our infrastructure, innovated how we cultivate resources, heat our homes, and power our businesses – and it has spread throughout the globe.  Freedom in innovation has given birth to a seemingly endless potential for individual wealth, and as a designed consequence, our nation has reaped a collective reward. 

            The power of the individual being set free to put his mind to something and be unhampered in the pursuit of that goal, gave us the light bulb, the telephone, the automobile, the air plane and the internet.  It’s the collective mind frame that if we want to, we can put a man on the moon.  Our potential, from the individual, systemically to the apex of government, is limitless.

            The concept of the American Dream, though, has fundamentally evolved over our history.  Contemporarily, the American Dream is widely considered to merely be the ability to bring prosperity to oneself by dint of living within our boarders.  In common parlance, in fact, the American Dream is widely used as a description of personal achievement so as to convey the pride of home ownership; our society’s ostensible symbol of individual success.

            I myself live in this “American Dream”.  Nestled in a quiet cul-de-sac in a middle-class, suburban neighborhood just off of Route 66, Northern Virginia’s major artery leading into the heart of the Nation’s Capital, sits my single family, center-hall Colonial with a two car garage and yes, a white picket fence.  Parked in the garage are a Ford Escape Hybrid and a Ford Fusion Hybrid.  And when I sit on my backyard patio, enjoying my personal oasis, proud that all of this is paid for by my salary as an attorney at law, I’m grateful for my little piece of heaven, my tangible piece of the American Dream.

            But there’s so much more to my American Dream – and everyone else’s for that matter.   The majesty of the American Dream transcends the basic achievement of material plenty.  The simple fact that I am lucky enough to have a respected job, beautiful home and comfortable cars tells nothing of my core beliefs, my upbringing, and my complete respect and appreciation for all that I am so privileged to have. 

          For me, it is my parent’s story that resonates as symbolic of the very underpinnings of the American Dream.  You see, personally, and I believe it to be the case for so many Americans, family is where the American Dream is born and from where it emanates.  Because, if I had to boil a definition of the American Dream down to a single word, that word would be hope.  A hope to be free of the shackles of tyranny or religious persecution; hope for a better life for oneself and most of all, hope for a better life for our children.  This hope, this American Dream, drove our ancestors to brave the icy clutches of the Atlantic in pursuit of a New World, and the vision lives on today as more people continue to immigrate to our shores in pursuit of a better and more free life than to any other nation on the planet.

            In the 1960s, my mother, Gerd Dahling Kidwell, boarded a ship from Norway, not much unlike the seafaring explorer Leaf Ericson had centuries before.  Leaving behind her home country, she came to America as an opare for a wealthy British family. 

        One particularly hot summer evening, my mother went out with a group of her Norweigan girlfriends to have a drink at the Bavarian Inn in Washington D.C.  It was there that she caught the eye of a tall, handsome, United States Army Specialist: my father, H. Kent Kidwell.  Stationed in Fort Mede, and off for the evening, he and his army friends were also out looking for a good time.

            I’ll never forget the story, and of course the story is different depending upon whether my mother or father tells it.  But, as I chose to remember it – my father, confident as he is, strutted over to my mother and offered to buy her a drink.  Already Americanized, and thusly opportunistic, my mother accepted the young gentleman’s offer.  It wasn’t long after her drink had arrived that my father asked her out.  She pretended like she couldn’t understand him at first, now that she had her drink of course, politely thanked him for the cocktail, and ignored him.

            But if my father is one thing, he’s persistent.  He asked her again.  She said no.  He went away and then came back later in the evening to ask her out again.  Same answer.  And so this playful back and forth went on for the entire evening until finally she said yes.  The rest of the story, as they say, is history.

            My father’s stubborn persistence, I believe, comes as a direct result of his childhood.  The reason why I believe I live the American Dream is because my father personifies the core principles of American Dream. 

 My father grew up in many households, but he first lived with his mother in the tiny, Appalachian mountain town of Great Cacapon, West Virginia.  Great Cacapon is an unincorporated town nestled in the blue ridge valley on the shores of the Cacapon River, a stone’s throw north of where the river meanders into the mighty Potomac.  The town straddles a quiet, two-lane road, Route 9, and if you blink, you’ll miss it.

             As an adult, my father built a small log cabin about ten miles north of Great Cacapon.  In fact, I wrote the first words of this thesis sitting on the cabin’s screened porch, overlooking a five acre field, a now vacant cow pasture, valleyed in the shadow of a tree-hugged mountain towering over the Cacapon River.

              My father purchased the land upon which the cabin is now built in 1987, and since then our family and friends have made the two hour drive from Northern Virginia to visit as often as possible.  Anybody and everybody who has ever been to this remote sanctuary will attest that as soon as you turn off route 9 onto the gravel road,  roll the car windows down to hear the crackle of the rocks under the tires and that first breath of fresh mountain air blows in your face, you are immediately at peace.  In that very moment, the hustle and bustle mindset of any beltway-insider will melt away.

            From there you travel about a mile and a half down a meandering, dirt and gravel trail, greeted by herds of deer sometimes exceeding forty-strong, until you come to the Kidwell property. 

            Before the cabin was built, we’d pitch tents in the field just off the river’s embankment.  I’ll always remember the first night we pitched tents on the property.  We stopped at a butcher’s shop on the way up to get the obligatory steaks which we grilled on a miniscule portable Weber.  It was just the four of us, my mom, dad, sister and I, and least I forget, the family dog, Barrister.  

            My mother boiled water which she’d scooped straight from the river.  “This water is so pure kids,” my father was sure to boast, “that the number one source of pollution is cow manure.”  To this day, I’m not sure how that was supposed to make us feel like the water was clean, but I digress. That night we all woke up in about two inches of water that’d leaked into our poorly erected tents from a torrential downpour.  The perfect family memory.  I was seven.

            Being that the cabin is only ten miles from Great Cacapon, we’d often drive into town.  “The first house on the left, the yellow one”, my father would tell us, our great grandfather built with his bare hands.  He used to ring the town’s church bell and apparently moonlighted as a boxer at fights staged on the very property where our cabin is now built. 

            We always stopped in at Magio’s, a small, general store, even if we didn’t really need anything.  At the clerk’s counter, the store owner, Mrs. Magio, set a jar filled with water and a shot-glass at rest on its bottom.  If you could drop a quarter in the water and make it into the shot-glass, you’d get a free piece of candy.  I always loved playing because, even if I lost, my mother would let me pick out a Superman comic book. 

            Magio’s has been closed for some time now.  Like many of the buildings in the small town of Great Cacapon, the window’s are boarded up and the edifice is falling into a state of disrepair.  The town’s rate of decline seems to have accelerated in recent years.

            My father did not grow up wealthy in the 1940s version of this little town in West Virginia.  It was just him, his younger brother, Tom, and his mother — his parents had divorced.  He doesn’t talk about it much, but my father opines that he never really knew his father, barely remembers him. 

            When he was sixteen years old, his mother burned their house down when falling asleep with a lit cigarette in hand.  Soon thereafter she passed on, and with his father dead of cancer, he was, for all-intensive purposes, orphaned with a younger brother to look after.

            My father bounced around from house to house, living with this aunt and that, until he was taken in by his mother’s second husband, John Manuel, after-whom I’m named. 

            John Manuel was a business man.  In fact, one of my father’s first jobs was as a trash collector at the “Big M”, a drive-in movie theatre owned and operated  by my grandfather  in Churchville, Maryland.  He taught my father respect, the value of hard work, discipline, and above all, to always look up the definition of a word he didn’t know – a habit my father has passed on to me.

            My father’s checkered childhood left him with a chip on his shoulder.  I imagine it would any young man.  He was smart and determined, and he had something to prove.  It’s as a result of my grandfather’s role as a surrogate father figure – the fact that he taught my father the importance of dignity and discipline, that my father’s determination was channeled positively.

            In 1962, after his second year of undergraduate study at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland, my father joined the United States Army in its fight against the Viet-Cong in Vietnam.  He served three years as an Army Specialist, during which time he studied Russian at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, California, prior to being stationed in Turkey with the task of intercepting messages from the Soviet Union which was supplying the National Liberation Front in their guerilla war against American troops.

            It was while on military leave that my father met my mother at the Bavarian Inn in Washington, D.C.  She worked as a dental assistant while my father continued to serve.  And when he returned, he married her in front of a General District Court Judge in Arlington, Virginia, no witnesses, no friends, just he and his bride.

            The Department of Veterans Affairs paid for my father to finish out his undergraduate studies at George Washington University, and in 1968 he graduated with a degree in Political Science. 

            At first he was going to get a Masters in Political Science and become a professor – he’d even been accepted into the program.  But at the last minute he decided, on second thought, he’d rather become a lawyer. 

            While my father attended the George Washington University School of Law he and my mother built a life out of nothing.  Collectively, they literally had nothing, not even a sofa to sit on.  But she worked and he studied, and they built a life.

            In 1971 my father joined Harrell and Muchler, a small general-practice law firm located in Bailey’s Cross-Roads, Virginia.  In 1977 he became partner and in 1985 he bought the firm and has been its leader ever since.

            My father and mother, an orphan from West-Virginia and a first-generation, Norwegian immigrant, started with nothing, and in this land of opportunity, through perseverance and devotion, they built a family.

            I grew up in what would likely be considered Middle-Class America.  By no means ever rich, some years more frugal than others, but we were never poor.  We were always comfortable, living in a larger than average house, in a quiet, safe, suburban neighborhood.  The first thing my father taught me, aside from basketball, of course, was the importance of family.

            My family is very traditional, the kind that, unfortunately, is waning in modern America.  We sat down at seven o’clock every night to have a family dinner.  My mother would set a candle lit table and cook a four course meal.  We gathered, said grace then ate.  Then it would begin…

            My father would commence by asking questions.  The first to twenty would win – what, I still don’t know.  Respect, I guess.  My sister and I would lean forward in eager anticipation and he’d ask away. He’d quiz us on the Bill of Rights and spout off the preamble to the Constitution.  Sometimes there’d be no questions, instead he’d pontificate on the concept of state rights versus federal powers, Lockean philosophy, and the notion of ordered liberty, or regale us with a story gleaned from one of his court cases.  

            Over the years we kept the same basic tradition.  Dinner every night, with some meals in front of the TV for sure, some missed here and there because, well, that’s just life, but for the most part, at the kitchen table with a candle lit.  Family Time! 

            My friends loved to come over, not just for my mom’s delicious cooking, but also for the twenty questions and story times, even if it meant no hats at the dinner table and always being required ask to be excused from the table.  Even now, it’s the same.

            It’s at that table that I learned the importance of family; the significance of respect, rules and hard work.  My parents instilled in me the considerate ways of life that, today, are regrettably ignored by so many of us.  In that warm, loving environment, I not only learned, but lived the American Dream. 

           As a young adult, I had the occasion to travel to various destinations in the third world.   What struck me as truly inspirational was that no matter how destitute and seemingly hopeless an existence some of these people appeared to live, they were always smiling and somehow, despite it all, genuinely happy.  That tells me something about the human spirit.  

          Still, witnessing with my own eyes, the extreme poverty some of these people were enduring was profoundly saddening.    They had so little – no electricity, no running water, and little food.  There was insufficient shelter and the shelter that existed would have twenty years ago been condemned uninhabitable in even our worst ghettos.   An inexplicable guilt grew deep into the pit of my stomach.  Why me?  Why do I deserve any better? 

 As a political science major in my undergraduate studies at the University of Mary Washington I studied the acute poverty of the less fortunate, but it was truly witnessing the outwardly blighted existence of so many across this world that widened my eyes to fully appreciate and actually understand the true majesty of the American Dream.  Talking to the forgotten souls of Mirmansk, Russia and eating with the Andean mountain guides of Peru, listening to how they revere America and what we as a nation stand for, has helped me to realize the influence our dream of liberty has as it reaches across our borders and spreads hope.   

           I’ve learned that the American Dream is also the unique ability of each generation to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to carry forward that noble idea, that precious, God-given truth that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their dreams by dint of being a citizen of this great nation.  I am a product of this liberty — all members of my generation and the generations before me residing in these United States and protected as to our unalienable rights are a creation of this truth.

           Collectively, each individual American is the American Dream, having been raised up on the shoulders of the generation preceding them.  As it endures today, the American Dream, simply put, is the culmination of generations before who benefited from the luxuries afforded in freedom and who carried forward liberty’s torch.  Why me?  Why do I deserve better?  To the latter – I don’t!  To the former – because I am fortunate enough to be an American!

            The hard work my parents put into building a life from nothing, raising my sister and me in a compassionate, ordered household, gave me the chance to go to school in one of the top ranked public school systems in the nation; it afforded me the opportunity to attend college and it instilled in me the drive to practice law.  It fostered in me the ability and the determination to build a better life for myself, my family, and – what I truly believe to be an essential element of the American Dream, the philanthropic aspiration to build a better life for everyone around me.

            Yet, the American Dream, however defined, is in numerous ways under siege.  Our nation is facing crisis in every direction; from the war on terror and economic depression, to climate change and educational, institutional and infrastructural decay. 

            In many ways the shining light on the hill is flickering in the dark, teetering on the brink of a blackening abyss borne of domestic decay and international pressures.  To many, and certainly for me, it’s become palpable.  Something is wrong – worse than normal. 

           The sun that once graced the amber waves of grain is graying behind a looming storm of mounting predicament.  There is a measurable sapping of confidence across our land, both in the confidence that our future will be bright and in the confidence our people have in our government as a just institution.  Sleepless nights are replete with the nagging nightmare that America’s decline is inevitable, that the next generation must lower its sights, expect to die younger and endure into a diseased planet.  In the wake of the sub-prime lending scandal, homes have been lost, jobs evaporated, businesses shuttered and families turned upside-down in economic depression.

            The reports of massacres the likes of Virginia Tech, Fort Hood and the Tragedy in Tuscon seem to be increasing in regularity and the media continuously bombards us with reports of global warming and looming economic catastrophe.  We find ourselves in the midst of two wars that have collectively endured longer than our nation’s involvement in the Revolutionary, Civil, and both World Wars combined, and with the crisis in Libya added to the shoulders of our over-stretched military.  Globally, we are witness to famine, water shortage, genocides and the spread of tyranny and extremism – none of which seem to have been curtailed by the efforts of those fighting the good fight.

            It’s nearly become overwhelming, and when the citizens of this nation turn to their political leaders, too often, they find them deaf to their cries or so deeply entrenched in party line, demonizing the other side and virtually factionalizing our nation, rather than uniting it to the common goal of tackling these critical issues.

           But, America is too important, and we as a people are too resilient to simply fade into the dark.  What we as a nation stand for: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and as the shining light of the last best hope for the remainder of humanity, must be preserved. 

         Our system is of government is flawed, but more perfect than any other on this globe.  Therefore it is up to this generation to again pick up liberty’s torch and collectively face the enemies of freedom that lurk in the dark. Let us give the greatest generation a run for its money, for the current status quo, a norm of division, hatred and faction, must be shunned so that we may continue the pursuit of a brighter future for us all.  We must climb back atop that hill and shine the light, embracing our flaws, facing the escalating issues and daunting tasks before us as one nation, under God, with the common goal of tackling them for a more perfect union for our people and for all peoples across this world. 

         For it is also a constituent of the American Dream that all who have the privilege of freedom also have the honor and duty to fight for it.  Join me!

                         

STAY TUNED FOR CHAPTER ONE: LEADING BY EXAMPLE

WHAT I SEE IN AMERICA’S DESPAIR: HOPE!

Across this great land, the faces of the once proud and mighty seem to be weighed down in mounting anxiety.   Our confidence is shot as everything seems to have gone wrong and the outlook appears only a downward spiral.

Unemployment is still over 9% nationwide with 8%+ unemployment expected through 2014.  Commodity inflation is squeezing our pockets as well, with over 1 in 10 Americans on food stamps and 1 in 4 children across the states finds themselves without ample food on a daily basis. In the wake of our nation’s credit downgrade, the stock markets are crashing with fears of a double dip recession, while we the people stop and ask, when did the recession ever end? 

Time Magazine termed the decade from 2000 – 2010 as the “Decade from Hell”, but in 2011, it only seems to be getting worse.  Mother Nature, it seems, is equally disgruntled.  This year alone we have witnessed record breaking blizzards across the east, massive flooding across the Mississippi watershed, record Tornadoes that have taken unimaginable life and caused catastrophic damage, wide-spread drought the likes of which have never been seen, and a heat wave that literally set thousands of record highs across the nation while parts of Texas experienced 57 consecutive days of 100 degrees or higher temperatures.  And least we forget the Tsunami that wiped entire cities from Japan’s coast and plunged them into a nuclear crisis on par with Chernobyl. 

Our nation is facing crisis in every direction; from the war on terror and economic depression, to climate change and educational, institutional and infrastructural decay.  In many ways the shining light on the hill is flickering in the dark, teetering on the brink of a blackening abyss borne of domestic decay and international pressures.  To many, and certainly for me, it’s become palpable.  Something is wrong – worse than normal. 

The sun that once graced the amber waves of grain is graying behind a looming storm of mounting predicament.  There is a measurable sapping of confidence across our land, both in the confidence that our future will be bright and in the confidence our people have in our government as a just institution.  Sleepless nights are replete with the nagging nightmare that America’s decline is inevitable, that the next generation must lower its sights, expect to die younger and endure into a diseased planet.  In the wake of the sub-prime lending scandal, homes have been lost, jobs evaporated, businesses shuttered and families turned upside-down in economic depression.

The reports of massacres the likes of Virginia Tech, Fort Hood and the Tragedy in Tuscon seem to be increasing in regularity and the media continuously bombards us with reports of global warming and looming economic catastrophe.  We find ourselves in the midst of two wars that have collectively endured longer than our nation’s involvement in the Revolutionary, Civil, and both World Wars combined, and with the crisis in Libya added to the shoulders of our over-stretched military.  Globally, we are witness to famine, water shortage, genocides and the spread of tyranny and extremism – none of which seem to have been curtailed by the efforts of those fighting the good fight.

It’s nearly become overwhelming, but in America’s despair, what do I see?  Hope.  I don’t see the inevitable decline into a lesser existence.  I see the strength and wisdom of a society freer than all on this planet – free in a republic to make the changes necessary to tackle the critical issues facing us.  I see hope!

Yet, while there is hope, there must also be action.  And, therein lies our problem.  When the citizens of this nation turn to their political leaders, too often, they find them deaf to their cries or so deeply entrenched in party line, demonizing the other side and virtually factionalizing our nation, rather than uniting it to the common goal of tackling these critical issues.

But, America is too important, and we as a people are too resilient to simply fade into the dark.  What we as a nation stand for: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and as the shining light of the last best hope for the remainder of humanity, must be preserved. 

Our system of government is flawed, but more perfect than any other on this globe.  Therefore it is up to this generation to again pick up liberty’s torch and collectively face the enemies of freedom that lurk in the dark. Let us give the greatest generation a run for its money, for the current status quo, a norm of division, hatred and faction, must be shunned so that we may continue the pursuit of a brighter future for us all.  We must climb back atop that hill and shine the light, embracing our flaws, facing the escalating issues and daunting tasks before us as one nation, under God, with the common goal of tackling them for a more perfect union for our people and for all peoples across this world. 

For it is also a constituent of the American Dream that all who have the privilege of freedom also have the honor and duty to fight for it.

This is precisely why I have written my book – LEADING BY EXAMPLE: RETURNING OUR REPUBLIC TO ITS REVOLUTIONARY ROOTS.  In it, I address the myriad critical issues facing our nation.  More importantly, I have painstakingly researched each subject in order to do much more than most political treatises seem to do these days: I not only diagnose the problem, but take it a step further and propose solutions. 

Therefore, as a gift to my fellow patriots, I am releasing my book for free.  My goal here is not to make millions (though that would be nice), rather, my goal is to help educate and galvanize my fellow Americans to action. 

I will be releasing each chapter, dependent upon size, as three or more blogs, throughout the next several weeks.  My hope is that my readers will spread the word, pass my message along, and spark a lively conversation/debate as to these critical issues and, more importantly, how to resolve them.  I want for people to propose solutions and how they think we should address the issues.  What I don’t want is for people to sit back and simply gripe about the issues facing us, and how the Republicans and Democrats are failing to address them, pointing fingers – Capital Hill does enough of that for us (unfortunately).  Let’s put our heads together America, and dig out of his hole…NOW!

Recognizing, as we do, the importance of dealing with education, illegal immigration, the environment, etc., we can no longer allow our representatives to promise reform and fail to deliver.  We must revolutionize with lightning speed, the likes of which we have not seen since we completely re-tooled industrialized America in a matter of months to churn out the bullets, planes and ships necessary to win World War II. 

With equal, perhaps greater resolve, we must retool and revitalize our industrial complex to modernize and erect a new, efficient energy grid.  Talking about the potential of solar energy, wind power, and how we theoretically can rid ourselves of dependence on foreign fuel will no longer cut it. 

Talk is cheap.  We must take immediate action to revamp public education in order to properly prepare our children for the rigors of a global marketplace.   We must finally take steps to remove corruption in our government and demand fidelity in our representatives, rather than perpetuate it through our continued indifference to incumbent fraudulence.

But, to do so, we must all come together, united to the singular goal of prevailing as a cohesive, patriotic force.  Together, we can accomplish anything, but in a House divided, we will all fail.  We must collectively cast aside our egocentric factions as the critical issues into which I’ve delved are faced by all Americans, regardless of race, creed or party. 

Guided by our shared American ideals, we must shun our growing predisposition to demonize one another; individually and systemically to the summit of Capital Hill.  We must stand up, all of us, and demand that our elected officials reach across party isles, not for bi-partisan reform, but for American reform!   

Returning to our revolutionary roots, relearning and reaffirming our core principals as a nation – this is how we will win the war on terror, revitalize our economy, and advance a more perfect union for ourselves and our progeny.  In this dark hour, it is our privilege as a free people and our absolute duty to lead our families, our neighbors, and the remainder of the world, by shining example.

IT IS TIME FOR SOMEBODY TO STAND UP!  WELL, I AM STANDING RESOLUTE.  JOIN ME!!